August 26, 2014

August 15, 2014

IR 33 The Korogocho,Kenya DUBuMentry & Graffiti Experience

(Source: vimeo.com)

July 25, 2014

RoninTafari - A collaboration project of multi-national group of musicians artists and producers. presents “Black Gold”

July 17, 2014

salute to augustus pablo and King Tubby

July 3, 2014
 
"It’s really about control, my body, my mind. Who was going to own it? Them? Or me? I’m not a one-man woman. Bottom line.”
-Nola Darling

 

"It’s really about control, my body, my mind. Who was going to own it? Them? Or me? I’m not a one-man woman. Bottom line.”

-Nola Darling

(Source: radioraheemsdaughter)

July 3, 2014
 

 

(Source: blasiannirvana)

July 3, 2014
"Arguably, one of the most familiar memes of science fiction is that of going to foreign countries and colonizing the natives… for many of us that is not a thrilling adventure story; it’s non-fiction and we are on the wrong side of the strange-looking ship that appears out of nowhere."

— Excerpt from preface to “So Long Been Dreaming”, by Nalo Hopkinson (via wordsforstrangers)

(via afrofuturistaffair)

July 3, 2014
teachingliteracy:

fishingboatproceeds:
Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.
I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.
He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.
He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.
Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.
It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.

teachingliteracy:

fishingboatproceeds:

Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.

I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.

He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.

He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.

Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.

It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.

(via ladyfresh)

July 2, 2014

June 18, 2014

March 18, 2014
"Can 10,000 hours of practice really make you an expert at anything?… The psychologists reanalyzed data from six previous studies of chess competitions (1,083 subjects in total) and eight studies of musicians (628 total) for correlations between practice and success, and found huge disparities in how much chess grandmasters and elite musicians had practiced. One chess player, for example, had taken 26 years to reach a level that another reached in a mere two years. Clearly, there’s more at work than just the sheer volume of hours practiced."

— New study confirms the idea that the “10,000-hours rule” is a myth. (via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog, via digitalbin)

March 14, 2014
"I don’t broadcast every high & I don’t hide every low. I’m trying to live. I’m not trying to convince the world I have life."

(Source: bekkethatsall, via guerrillamamamedicine)

March 9, 2014

..a little sand…but not the beach

March 8, 2014
"I find that most people worth knowing are fucked up in some way or another."

— Jonathan Tropper  (via quintessenceofacliche)

(Source: iamcharliesangel, via guerrillamamamedicine)

March 7, 2014
"Feminism isn’t about making women stronger. Women are already strong. It’s about changing the way the world perceives that strength."

— G.D. Anderson (via ruedamour)

(Source: saperathebook, via musicnerdery)